Hollywood and Booze – The Good Old Days

We have often poked fun at the modern hysteria surrounding the use of alcohol here at The Notes.

I can’t remember the last time I read or watched a news story involving booze which didn’t also include some overly simplistic moral subtext wagging a disapproving finger at our inability to be anything other than reckless, impulsive infants while under the influence. And while I’d love to write a screenplay which involves an adult, and comical, relationship with the bottle I can’t see the possibility of any modern television or film production doing so without feeling it also has to show the consequences. Consequences which, in our modern cultural climate, could only be portrayed as bad.

Which is why I’d have loved to have been writing in an era when booze was celebrated in the way it was in The Thin Man series. Great gags. Fabulous on-screen chemistry between William Powell and Myrna Loy. And, boy, did they sink a few…

Oxygenated Booze? This Dr says YES

As some of our regular readers may have noticed I have been somewhat tied up of late.

This may be the case for a while (and hopefully it is… a dream writing job has turned up and will, with any luck, keep me busy for at least six months) but I’m aiming to get back to regular posting as soon as I establish some sort of routine. I’ve always been a creature of habit and changing a regular routine for a new one often takes me a bit of time. What doesn’t change, however, is the urge to have a delicious beverage as the sun goes down.

So it was with some degree of excitement I noticed that Korean scientists have discovered a way of tweaking booze and lessening the dreaded morning after effects, without tampering with its strength.

We've all been there. On occasions I've also woken up wearing a similiar dress.

Drs Kwang-il Kwon and Hye Gwang Jeong have studied the properties of oxygenated alcohol, a popular snifter in Korea, similiar to carbonated drinks elsewhere but using oxygen instead of carbon dioxide. When you drink alcohol, your body needs to oxidize it to water and carbon dioxide in order to process it. This occurs via hepatic oxidation, but the enzymes in your liver require oxygen to process the booze. It’s thought that by storing the oxygen in the alcohol itself, the system functions more quickly and efficiently.

In short, it means fewer and less savage hangovers without sacrificing all the fun of getting off with ugly people and cravings enormous kebabs at 3am.

If you can find it in your local shops, pick yourself up a bottle of O2 Linn. I love their blurb, for “Brain, Body, Beauty” indeed!

Boozing through the recession

The current recession has seen some marked changes in consumer behaviour. This has generally been a move towards austerity, so much so that a Continue reading

Good News for Campers (Warning- Bear Photo Ahead)

In 2008 my wife and I spent our Christmas holiday trekking down Hinchinbrook Island on the Thorsborne Trail.

Hinchinbrook - Australia's largest Island National Park

For those of you who like the odd night under canvas and don’t mind freeze dried Continue reading

Liquor review — Hayman’s Old Tom Gin

A new brand of gin, Hayman’s Old Tom Gin, has turned up on the shelves at my local liquor store, so before buying, I thought I’d do a little research on line.

I found what seemed like a most excellent review at Tasting.com:

Clear with a silvery cast. Interesting aromas of graham cracker, almond, creamy lemon frosting, sweet spices, and delicate herbal juniper follow through on a soft, round entry to a sweet medium body with Continue reading

Is the Champagne bubble about to pop?

Champagne producers have spent hundreds of years ensuring their product is associated intimately with notions of power and luxury. The Madrid Treaty of 1891 protected the brand from usurpers, and lawyers working for the producers have fought a number of legal actions in order to continue Continue reading

Your round? A pint of extreme beer for me, thanks!

If you thought that Elephant Beer was strong with alcohol content of nigh on 8 per cent, or Chimay was pushing things at 9 per cent, then wait till you see the alcohol content that some U.S. producers have been Continue reading